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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
on a regular basis with your parents? >> yes. that was part of my interest. back in the new york city public schools, i had a great teacher. mrs. roth would read the newspaper and about martin luther king. he was rising in all of that, and the civil rights movement and she exposed us to lot. but i was just a junkie. the time i was 9 years old, i was handing leaflets out for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay who was running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party headquarters and was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york. some women thought this was really cute, this little boy and leaflets. and she asked me why. and i made the case and got in early start in my political career. she said this is for you and she hands this box of pastries. i took a back to the liberal headquarters and we opened it up and there were all of these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics -- the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughnuts. [
on the part of the public. why has the city never been able to get its arms around that level of fraud and abuse and what does it say for the expansion of government? >> it is expenses -- expensive to weed out the fraud and abuse. it takes a lot of government time and money. i do think it is worth doing. her we do not do it nearly enough. but it has been something -- government, at times, is wasteful in what it does not do as much as it is in what it does do. it never is risen to the top level as i think it should and hope it does. one of the reasons i did not want a government-run option is because that would have been a dumping ground for another government program to provide insurance and move away from the private market. i believe in the private market for insurance. there are cases where people are not insurable in the private market, that you have a government program. that is why it came about. " we are capable of crunching numbers to figure out how you cover people of a certain age block of have an entire barac them. we were able to find a way to do it through a private market
the city has canceled the los angeles premiere of this film. i think some self restraint is in order. i do not believe gratuitous violence does not help the situation. i do not want to curtail our first or second amendment rights of the constitution. host: there is this headline in "the washington post" this morning. host: does that need to be looked at as well? guest: we had much more of a country that still restricted alcohol after prohibition four decades ago. that is one reason atf has fewer agents. canada tried to register the firearms and tried for over 10 years and finally dropped it. that didn't work out. i am not saying we shouldn't keep better records. fbi and other agencies should look at the background of everyone. i am not an expert in all these areas. having this debate where everybody blames the gun and everybody says it is the people involved on the other side, that is too simplistic. we have to put everything on the table. we can debate everything. we should debate our mental health situation. connecticut does not allow forced medication for people that are mentally ill. a
in a very densely populated region of new york city, long island, and the southern portions of new york state. and so i think it's a stark reminder, a very real example, a very painful outcome that speaks to the need of investing, investing in our infrastructure. and so as we go forward there's also an opportunity to improve upon what existed at the time of these storms. for instance, in the energy networks, utility networks, we can do state of the art. we have taught other nations how to build those systems. it's time to do nation building at home. and i think the beauty here is that while we invest in transportation and other infrastructure, energy infrastructure and water systems and treatment centers and treatment systems and public schools, what we're doing is rippling into the benefits of efficiency, of public safety, of employment and economic development. that is a positive series of dynamics that then lifts the economy and provides for work. 90% of the jobs, it's projected, that come from this sort of infrastructure investment are speaking to middle income households. jobs that
weeks ago i was giving a speech at a fancy hotel in new york city. when i arrived in the banquet hall, i was approached by a group of u employees like the ones were working here tonight in the hotel's catering department. they had heard the story and had a gift for me. it presented me with this employee name tag -- rubio, bartender. [laughter] [applause] do you know what this reminds me of? this reminds me that there are millions of marco rubio's out there. they are not looking for a handout. all they want is a chance to vie for their families, that there are not enough jobs out there. many do not have the skills for jobs that are available. they want a chance to earn a life for themselves in a better future for the children. what better chance than now? it all starts with the people in the kitchens of our hotels and the landscaping crews that work in our neighborhoods and the late-night janitorial shifts that clean our offices -- that is where you will find the genes that america was built upon -- dreams that america was built on. their journey is our nation's destiny. if they can gave
served our efforts in this city and at home in indiana for the past 12 years. i leave this body truly humbled. when i look back at the caliber of the staff that we have been able to call to this mission. servant leaders all. they are men and women who approach each and every day with a servant's heart, made sacrifices over the years in order to serve the people of indiana with integrity and energy. names like bill smith and lonnie zanarky. josh pickcok, paul teller, mark short, brian neal, just to name a few. you know, i don't have time tonight to name all the men and women who served us in various capacities over these last 12 years, but i would ask unanimous consent to submit each and every one of their names to the congressional record this night. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. pence: before i yield the floor for the last time, let me close simply by speaking a word of confidence and one more word of gratitude. some people look on in washington, d.c., and they are rightly frustrated. some people can't come to this nation's capital -- some people can com
for city council, for school boards, for municipal government that go unfilled every year because people don't run for them. and you can start anywhere. so i would say to all the women in the audience, to all of your children, to all of your girls cannot tell them to run because that is how we will get aoman president pierre >> that is a great point pierre >> i had 24 hours to make my decision about running the first time for state senate. i would not have run. i called my husband and said they asked me care at the kids and the law practice and you have your job. and my husband said you are really did this and we will make it work. >> the corollary about the minivan and the phone, my boys, when there were little, they used to say, mom, you are always on the phone. i told them that i get paid by the word. [laughter] >> i would not have run for senate if it were not for my husband. i quit my role as attorney general entered a year-and-a- half off of work. we went from one income -- we went from two incomes to one income. he said, i will make it work. i want your voicehere. it does take som
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)